Surviving Without Money – The Simple Life

frugal-living-tipsSurviving Without Money – The Simple Life

 

Can you really survive without money? Would you want to?  Probably not, but sometimes learning how to simplify your life – or find ways to reduce your expenses can make it easier to have a bigger life. If you have less overhead – and less stuff, guess what – you’ll probably have more room in your life for the things that are really important to you.

Not to mention that if you proactively learn to simplify you’re always providing some great insurance against when really bad things happen.  I was watching the movie “So This is 40” in which Paul Rudd plays one half of a very over extended yuppie couple. He’s missing mortgage payments, his credit cards are maxed out and his business is on the rocks.  But he gets a bit of sage advice from one of the musicians he represents – nobody too famous, but someone who gets to spend his days doing what he loves…Why? Because he has a small nut (nope and that is not something weird). Having a small nut to cover means that your monthly expenses are low.  The smaller the nut, the less you have to generate every month to keep it all going.

So aim for a small nut…and here are some ideas how RichMama’s can help minimize the family nut…

 

Gardening.

 

While cheap is good, where saving money is concerned, free is better. And harvesting a crop full of free vegetables is a tremendous savings. Once you get past the initial investment, the rest of blissful bounty!

 

If you’ve never gardened before, pick up a book at the library or ask a friend to teach you. If you have limited space, consider using the square foot gardening method, or growing vegetables in large containers, even buckets.

 

Gardening is not only easy, it’s fun. . Children can get involved by helping to plant seeds or pull weeds, and they’ll feel like the garden is as much theirs as anyone’s. Planting a garden not only will help you survive should your family income disappear, it will also build memories and skills that could last a lifetime.

 

Canning and freezing.

 

In addition to enjoying fresh vegetables from your garden, canning or freezing the excess will serve you well again when there is little money to buy food. You can ensure your family receives good nutrition without it costing anything additional except time, and canning jars. However, sites like Freecycle.com could supply a nice supply of jars free of charge.

 

You can also can soups, stews, and even meats. Just be sure to follow safe canning techniques for the type of food you’re storing, mark your jars well, and store them in a cool, dry place. Your local library will have a number of books on canning, but you can also find information on reputable websites if you prefer. Again, check online swapping sites for free or inexpensive canning equipment.

 

Small scale homesteading.

 

If possible, you might also want to consider getting a a rooster and a few hens so you can gather your own eggs. If you do a lot of baking, or if your family enjoys eggs, this can really save you money in the long run. If your income situation should become desperate, this could do a lot more than put eggs on the table – it could turn into a lucrative business.

 

Experienced egg gatherers recommend gathering eggs at least three times a day and getting them into a cool place for storage as soon as possible so they stay fresh. Eggs will easily last for a week or so.

 

Ideal storage for eggs is 50 degrees and up to 50 percent humidity if you plan to hatch out any of your eggs. Avoid the refrigerator if that’s your plan as it dries them out and they may not hatch.

 

 

Bartering.

 

Another way to survive when trying to save money is to barter which is the  the trade or exchange of goods and services you can provide, for those you need.

 

For instance, if you can cut hair, you can trade your hair cutting skills for car repair, lawn services, household items, or even food. Or, say you have furniture you no longer need, you can trade it for something you do need.

 

When bartering, just be sure to consider all costs involved and look for the best deal. While no cash is actually exchanging hands, the value of the goods and services traded should be comparable for the best deal all around. Also, be careful to keep records and check with the tax codes for bartering services.

 

Hopefully, your family will never face such dire financial circumstances where there you don’t have income, but learning how to live on less now will help you be better prepared for what’s next.  Check out the Rich Mama Academy for more on building your wealthy family.